Image

Jump In Often!

Just 20 minutes can set your child up for success. When you read to or with your child for 20 minutes each day, you help them build the skills they need to be strong readers. Even as early as 30 months old, the amount of new words a child learns can affect their reading skills down the road.
Image

Jump In Often!

Just 20 minutes can set your child up for success. When you read to or with your child for 20 minutes each day, you help them build the skills they need to be strong readers. Even as early as 30 months old, the amount of new words a child learns can affect their reading skills down the road.

Why each day?

Your child is most likely reading and working on literacy skills in school, but those after school, weekend and summer hours are critical in making sure your child reads on grade level throughout his/her education. The consistency of reading 20 minutes a day helps ensure that your child continues to read on grade level and doesn’t lose any skills achieved through school.
Even if your child is not yet in school, reading 20 minutes a day is an important daily routine that can build a strong foundation for future learning. In fact, 90% of a child’s brain is developed before age 5.

What if I can’t make the time?

What 20 minutes a day looks like for you and your child may be different from day to day. There are other activities you can do that will have a similar impact as reading does. For example, if you can’t read for the day, make up a story with your child using pictures.
This daily routine does not always have to be on the parents shoulders. Allow an older sibling to read to your younger child, or encourage your child to read aloud while shopping at the grocery store. With a little creativity, 20 minutes a day of reading can fit in to your busy schedule.
Image

Why each day?

Your child is most likely reading and working on literacy skills in school, but those after school, weekend and summer hours are critical in making sure your child reads on grade level throughout his/her education. The consistency of reading 20 minutes a day helps ensure that your child continues to read on grade level and doesn’t lose any skills achieved through school.
Even if your child is not yet in school, reading 20 minutes a day is an important daily routine that can build a strong foundation for future learning. In fact, 90% of a child’s brain is developed before age 5.

What if I can’t make the time?

What 20 minutes a day looks like for you and your child may be different from day to day. There are other activities you can do that will have a similar impact as reading does. For example, if you can’t read for the day, make up a story with your child using pictures.
This daily routine does not always have to be on the parents shoulders. Allow an older sibling to read to your younger child, or encourage your child to read aloud while shopping at the grocery store. With a little creativity, 20 minutes a day of reading can fit in to your busy schedule.
Image

Find an activity that works for you and your child on our family pages!

Image

I have an infant/toddler

Image

I have a pre-schooler

Image

I have an elementary student

Find an activity that works for you and your child on our family pages!

Image

I have an infant/toddler

Image

I have a pre-schooler

Image

I have an elementary student

Whether you are a parent, a teacher or a dedicated community member, you can get involved and support reading by ensuring all kids have access and support to get 20 minutes of reading in each day. See how you can jump in at the links below.

Still not sure where you fit in? Discover your role.

Take the quiz!
Whether you are a parent, a teacher or a dedicated community member, you can get involved and support reading by ensuring all kids have access and support to get 20 minutes of reading in each day. See how you can jump in at the links below.

Still not sure where you fit in? Discover your role.

Take the quiz!